Post-graduate

I’m Melissa, a first year Postgraduate Diploma Adult Nursing student.

I’m going to tell you about life at King’s.

In addition to all of the first-class academic schooling, King’s provides you with a plethora of activities and chill-out spaces found across our five campuses. Our Faculty uses four of these campuses, including Waterloo, Guy’s, St Thomas’ and Denmark Hill in South London. However, we can visit the Strand campus too with its beautiful architecture and Thames-side location – but all the facilities and books you need will be at the other four campuses. Whatever else you are after from university life is available to you on or near our campuses – keep reading!

If you are after an area to hang out and grab a bite to eat with your new friends, our campuses offer countless cafés and restaurants that cater to meat-eaters, vegans and those who follow a halal diet (among other food preferences) at discounted student prices.  Alternatively, you can sample a flavour of home by joining a society with dishes, films and events centred around your culture, or choose to learn about new cultures too – it’s your choice!  All of these options and many more are available to King’s students, and you will never be bored!

The King’s College London Student Union holds numerous events throughout the year and has more than 260 student-run societies and activity groups available for you to join. If none of these tickle your fancy, you’re more than welcome to start up your own society. Not only do you have the opportunity to run a society and add this information onto your CV, but King’s will support you in the management of your group in relation to decision-making, event-planning and money-handling. Find out more, here.

If you’d prefer to get your blood pumping, you can try kick-boxing or netball. We compete with other universities in fencing, rugby, basketball, karate, and many other sports. Find out more, here.

So whether you desire some reflection time within one of our prayer spaces, a tension-relieving dance session at one of our bars with some of your course mates, or a cheeky glass of wine at one of our restaurants –  the choice is 100% yours because here at King’s we recognise that true academic excellence can only be achieved by those who work hard and play harder.

Best wishes,

Melissa

Postgraduate Diploma Adult Nursing

 

Funding for nursing students explained by Melissa

My name is Melissa, and I am a postgraduate Adult Nursing student. In this blog I’ll be talking about funding.

Despite recent changes to the funding for undergraduate healthcare subjects, postgraduate diplomas are thankfully unaffected and diploma students will still be entitled to the NHS funded programme of study. This means that not only are your tuition fees paid for but, depending on whether you would be considered an independent (financially self-supporting) or a dependent student (financially reliant on one’s parent(s)/guardian), you may also be able to receive fiscal support for living costs. Click here to find out more!

So how does this process work? Once you receive an offer from King’s – whether it be unconditional or conditional – you will be prompted by UCAS to apply for your bursary. It is important to note that all students who apply to have their tuition fees paid for will receive a £1,000 annual bursary which is not means tested. So around March you can apply for your NHS Bursary, but you have until the end of May to apply and receive your allowance on time for the start of term. The application process is made simple through its step-by-step guide on what to do and, once you’ve filled in the online application with the relevant financial information, you will need to send off relevant original documentation to the given address. It is highly recommended that you use recorded delivery due to the importance of the documents.

Special allowances are also added to an individual’s entitlement, should they be eligible. This includes extra funding for childcare and adult dependents, among others. A London-weighting is also provided due to the high cost of living within a big city.

Once the whole process is complete you’ll be able to log into your account to see how much you are entitled to, and when you will receive your payment. However if your circumstances change during your studies, you are contracted to inform NHS Bursary and your allowance will follow suit. For example, if you are a classified as a dependent student living at home, and throughout the year you move out into your own accommodation, all you will need to do is fill in a ‘Change in circumstance’ form and send it off and your allowance will be altered.

Entitlement to the NHS Bursary is not at all affected by whether you possess a previous degree and/or a previous set of loans.

Lastly it’s important to stress that this may all seem rather daunting and possibly discouraging, but there are many opportunities to find work through King’s College London in order to obtain extra income. King’s also gives away annual scholarships and there is a Hardship Fund which provides eligible students struggling financially with monetary support.

Though the application process may be new and rather time-consuming, NHS Bursaries are the link to higher development and bright career aspects for many individuals. I can attest to this fact as I love my current studies and the career I’m moving into – and that wouldn’t be possible without going through this funding process. We here at King’s encourage you to research your options in regards to funding, and not allow finances to be a barrier between you and your destined career.

For the full list of funding scholarship and funding opportunities click here.

Best wishes,

Melissa Vandy

Adult Nursing

My first nursing placement

Having worked as healthcare assistant for almost three years prior to starting the nursing course, I had some preconceptions about what my first placement would be like.

This was an advantage and a disadvantage to me as one of my biggest worries was that I would fall back into the role of a healthcare assistant (HCA) on placement which would prevent me from learning as much as I could as a student nurse.

I expressed these worries to my mentor who encouraged me to understand my new role on the ward as a student nurse. An advantage to my experience was having a shorter adjustment period to get used to working in a hospital, which enabled me to get started on developing my skills. One way I was able to do this was by spending time, and sometimes a whole day, with members of the multidisciplinary team. I was able to learn about the role of Physiotherapists, Clinical Nurse Specialists, the Charge Nurse and Phlebotomists. This was very useful as by understanding the role of other members of the team I found it was easier to understand my own role.

It is worth saying that experiences will differ greatly from ward to ward for each individual. I feel as though one placement cannot be representative of your nursing career and learning experience which is why it is so great that we have a multitude of placements.

There will be some aspects that you enjoy and others that you don’t. I had to remind myself that it was ok to not enjoy 100% of the placement and that nursing is a challenging career. The thing that helped me the most throughout my placement was the support of my very dedicated mentor and liaising with my friends on the course who all have ups and downs themselves! Even at the end of such a short (5 week) placement I did feel sad to be leaving the team who had made me feel so welcome.

Geraldine, 1st Year, PG Dip Adult Nursing

For more information on PG Dip Adult Nursing, click here.

To read more about Geraldine’s experience’s, click here.

Rewards of Being A Nurse

Being a mental health nurse is both a challenging and rewarding role. The challenges are not only in terms of the emotional impact that caring for patients can have, but also the financial and political constraints that we often have to operate under while working in the NHS.

Despite numerous awareness and anti-stigma campaigns, the stigma of mental illness continues to permeate throughout society, albeit in many cases unintentionally. Thus, when an individual confides in you and ‘lets you in’ to their life, their suffering, their illness, it is a great privilege that should be treated with care and respect.

From admission to discharge, you support and follow the patient in their recovery journey while being able to contribute towards a positive outcome – which is a great feeling. Equally, liaising with family members is also a privilege, particularly when providing support and reassurance to them during a very difficult time.

Overall, being a mental health nurse offers great opportunities to support and treat individuals suffering from often complex mental health problems. It gives you a unique insight into other people’s lives, struggles and human experiences.

In addition, being a mental health nurse offers you wide and varied career opportunities. Therefore, if you are an ambitious, compassionate and caring individual, a career in mental health nursing could be for you.

Lewis, 1st Year PGDip Mental Health Nursing

For more information on Mental Health Nursing, click here.

For more information on PGDip Mental Health Nursing, click here.

Can part-time work fit with your studies?

I received mixed feedback about how easy it was to do part-time work alongside the university course but, from the start, I knew I wanted to work to keep my expenses under control.

The course, like any other university course, has some quieter periods throughout the year which is why casual work is so useful. It allows you to work more when it’s quiet and less when you have more hours on placement because you are in control of booking your own shifts.

Throughout my first term I experimented with a few different jobs to find out what would work for me. After struggling to find (healthcare assistant) HCA work on the bank, I decided to postpone that idea until I had done at least one placement as it would be easier to work within my principal Trust at that point.

I did temporary work in an office, as a waitress and with the University. If I could give any advice it would be don’t be afraid to tell your employer ‘no’. I had to remind myself that I moved to London to do the course and if I was so burned out from working all the time, I would not get the best experience from being a student nurse as possible. Saying that, London is a fantastic place to find casual, part-time work as there are so many working opportunities in the City. Therefore, if you need to work during the course, it will be easy to find work. The best opportunity I got was to work within the University, as you won’t be a student forever and it’s a great way of meeting people within the faculty!

Having a little extra cash has helped me enjoy my time off even more, allowing me to spend Christmas in a warmer climate. The hard work has been worth it!

Geraldine, 1st Year, PG Dip Adult Nursing

For more information on PG Dip Adult Nursing, click here.

For more information on the Perseverance Trust scholarship, click here.

A warmer Christmas break

My Christmas ‘Snowman’